2012

Our response to the gambling enquiry findings

Posted on August 3, 2012 by admin

“We are very disturbed by the committee recommendations. Instead of cutting back on destructive roulette machines in betting shops (known as Fixed Odds Betting Terminals – “FOBTs” or B2s), they are recommending more FOBTs in betting shops and allowing them in other venues.

“Adding more FOBTs in betting shops will not reduce betting shop premises clustering; it will result in increased machine clustering. (more…)

Reduce centralised gambling regulation, says committee

Posted on July 24, 2012 by admin

Decisions should be made where impacts are felt – locally – with just enough central regulation to protect vulnerable, especially children

In a report published on Tuesday 24 July 2012, the Commons Culture, Media and Sport Committee says that the Gambling Act 2005 resulted in numerous inconsistencies and is not sufficiently evidence based. The Committee says more power should be devolved to local authorities—which have the local knowledge to assess their impact—with central regulation existing to ensure high standards of protection for the vulnerable, particularly children. See our response here. (more…)

New Statesman Article

Posted on May 3, 2012 by admin

To read our submitted article in the New Statesman, warning against the dangers of addictive betting machines, click here

Primary Activity: Bookie’s showing the true colour of their money

Posted on March 22, 2012 by admin

It has been evident for some years that FOBT or B2 machine activity is exceeding over-the-counter activity in betting shops. Reviewing Ladbrokes recent accounts, it is apparent that over 80% of the turnover it generated is now from FOBTs, compared to under 20% from traditional betting.

Whilst it is accepted that the win figures from FOTB and over-the-counter betting activities are closer to 50% each, the fact that the machines generate four times as much turnover than the betting is indicative of problems they cause. These figures surely show beyond reasonable doubt the addictive and potentially harmful nature of these machines. (more…)