2014

Grandson, 10, spent £3,300 in online gambling spree

Posted on October 13, 2014 by admin

A 10-year-old ran up a £3,300 bill on a betting website – thinking he was playing a computer game.

The autistic youngster squandered the whopping sum in just 90 minutes, after gaining access to grandad Rick Powell’s online bookmaker’s account.

But the firm involved, gambling giant Bet365, is refusing to refund the four-figure sum.

Read more in the Sunday Post.

We must be alive to risks gambling poses to punters and their families

Posted on October 6, 2014 by admin

The then Labour Government’s Gambling Act(2005) gave a green light to private-enterprise gambling companies.

In particular, it allowed them to install many more gaming machines – fixed-odds betting terminals – where punters can bet up to £100 every 20 seconds.

We must all have noticed the growth in the number of bookmakers. Last year, Scottish bookies made profits of £122 million. Some 70 per cent of Scots have gambled in the past year: three million people. The Government gains from taxes on the firms.

Read the full article in The Herald Scotland online

Gambling addict blew £200,000 in ten years after becoming hooked on FOBTs

Posted on October 2, 2014 by admin

Simon Perfitt, 58, went from having a £50,000 a year job and a Porsche to losing his home and living on benefits as a result of his addiction.

A former gambling addict has revealed how he blew £200,000 in ten years after becoming hooked on fixed odds betting terminals.

Simon Perfitt, 58, went from a £50,000 job to living on benefits after he started playing the controversial machines – blowing up to £3,000 per day.

Read the full article in the Mirror and answer the Mirror’s online poll which asks: ‘Should the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals be reduced from £100?’

IT executive blew £200,000 on betting machines

Posted on October 1, 2014 by admin

A former gambling addict has revealed how he blew £200,000 in 10 years after becoming hooked on gambling machines.

Simon Perfitt, 58, went from a £50,000 job to living on benefits after he started playing fixed odds betting terminals (FOBT) – blowing up to £3,000 per day.

The businessman had led a lavish lifestyle back in 2001, enjoying well-paid jobs in e-commerce which allowed him to own a Porsche. He had also just moved in with a new girlfriend.

But Mr Perfitt, from Dudley, West Midlands lost it all after becoming addicted to playing roulette on the controversial machines, dubbed the crack cocaine of gambling and which rake in £1.5 billion-a-year in profit for bookmakers.

Read the full article in the Mail Online

Richard Godwin: Pull the plug on the bookies’ crack machines

Posted on September 19, 2014 by admin

Imagine you have a magic machine that prints money, up to £100 every 20 seconds, as long as you feed it a ready supply of credulity and desperation. Imagine you have four of these machines, all neatly lined up in a shop. Imagine you have four of these shops, all neatly lined up on a high street. You’d be laughing, wouldn’t you?

Now imagine someone threatens to shut them down. You’d be annoyed. You’d probably come up with some self-serving nonsense about how they’re part of British life and the 18 betting shops on High Street North in Newham are all part of a vibrant local economy.

Read the full article in The London Standard online.

Ladbrokes ads banned for ‘irresponsible attitude towards gambling’

Posted on September 19, 2014 by admin

Two poster adverts for Ladbrokes have been banned on the grounds that they “condoned an irresponsible attitude towards gambling”.

One showed a character nicknamed Mr Brightside with the slogan: “When you win it’s skill – when you lose it’s bad luck.” The other read: “Once is luck – twice is talent.”

There were 98 complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) about the bookmaker’s wider multi-media campaign, which featured five friends and carried the tagline:

Read the full article in The Guardian online.

Retail bookmakers are on to a dead cert

Posted on September 16, 2014 by admin

I am not by inclination a betting man, but I have always had an interest in the psychology and business of gambling.

Not only have I owned bookmakers’ shops, bingo halls and greyhound stadia, but some years ago I also co-authored a book on gambling. And as a participant and observer of the gaming industry, I find it astonishing how misguided the media and politicians have been about the dangers to public morality of supercasinos. The critics are attacking the wrong target.

 Read the full article in the FT. 

Bookmakers sign up to voluntary watchdog

Posted on September 15, 2014 by admin

Three of the four big high street bookmakers have signed up to a new voluntary watchdog in the hope of preempting a raft of tough statutory measures that threaten the prevalence of betting shops, high-speed roulette machines and aggressive punter-recruitment adverts promising “free money”.

William Hill, Ladbrokes and Coral, together with the smaller competitor Paddy Power, have promised from next month to remove all adverts for touch-screen roulette machines from their windows and to dedicate a fifth of the space to responsible gambling messages.

Read the full article in The Guardian online.

Arcades to install ‘crack cocaine’ betting machines

Posted on September 15, 2014 by admin

Thousands more highly addictive gambling machines could be installed on Britain’s high streets as amusement arcades seek to exploit a legal ruling by becoming betting shops.

The disclosure that major arcade chains are re-licensing adult gaming centres (AGCs) as betting shops in order to gain access to lucrative but controversial fixed odds betting terminals (FOBTs) has been met with fury by anti-gambling campaigners, who have said labelled the touch-screen roulette machines the “crack cocaine of gambling”.

Read the full article in The Independent online.

Bookies launch responsible gambling code

Posted on September 15, 2014 by admin

Bookmakers have tried to head off a growing political backlash against the industry by announcing voluntary measures to tackle problem gambling.

William Hill, Ladbrokes, Coral and Paddy Power have agreed to advertise less aggressively and to promote “responsible gambling” messages. They will also set up and fund a body called the Senet Group to “self-govern” the industry.

Read the full article in The Times online.